Peanut Brittle?

Today’s cooking class focused around grilling and using a spice rub – in this class we created a Jerk Spice Mixture to use as a marinade for our protein and vegetables. Most of the class used chicken while my lab partner and I got to work with tempeh (another first).

Tempeh is made from cooked and slightly fermented soybeans, and the one we used also contained organic brown rice.When I opened the package it sure looked a bit funny to me – – and actually looked more like peanut brittle.

Upon further review of the nutrition label I see that half of the portion here (4 ounces) contains a good amount of protein (22gm) which is equivalent to what you’d get for a 3 ounce portion of meat. The portion also had a good source of iron (20% of the Daily Value), lots of fiber (12gm) and 15% calcium.

The spice mixture was another first for me. Here’s what was included: allspice, thyme, black pepper, salt, fresh ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, along with some fresh chopped hot chiles, garlic, scallions, chopped onion, brown sugar, fresh lime juice, a touch of vegetable oil and soy sauce. This was all blenderized in the food processor and then we mixed with our sliced tempeh and long sliced zucchini and summer squash and let marinate for a while.

Then the grill was fired up. We learned how proper cross placement on the grill created good sear marks too.  It was actually an easy way to cook but because of the brown sugar content of the spice rub we had to watch the heat of the grill since the sugar can burn easier.

We also cooked up a quick batch of rice and we were good to go. My take? Well I was surprised at the spice heat from the mixture despite the sweetness essence of the other spices. And the tempeh?  Well . . .  for this first round of trying it I was not too impressed as it seemed a bit dry and textured; I think a good sauce with it would help for another attempt down the road.

As a side note about the chicken: another part of this class was learning how to fabricate or cut up a whole chicken. While I didn’t actually eat the chicken I did participate in the cutting steps of breaking down a whole chicken as a part of the course. Some of the students in my class had never done such a thing before and many were hesitant after realizing this whole chicken body had been a former live animal, but now here it was in front of us, gravity holding it ready for the blade once again. Even the meat eaters took a second take . . .  That’s what I love about this course – we get to see ALL the steps of what is involved in getting all types of food ready for consumption – and not just picking up a package from the store. The course really helps  practice  mindfulness skills for sure! (No photos of chicken cutting process; the experience was enough)! Hmmm, peanut brittle right now sounds pretty good.

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